Save the planet - work from home

Submitted by fredrik.nyman on Thu, 03/07/2019 - 10:30

In my last post i revealed how dirty a fiber network can be depending on the source of electricity powering the network. I showed how a typcial 24-port access switch might contribute anything between 23kg to 485kg of carbon dioxide per year to the atmosphere depending on the electricity mix and how that can be reduced with lowpower optical modules.

A key benefit that fiber networks enable is effective telecommuting - working from home or remote locations. The higher bandwidth provided by fiber and the cloudification of many applications allow more people to work from home. Obviously not all jobs can be performed remotely, but many can. I'll use myself as an example.

Working from home

I am fortunate, I have only 9 kilometers between my home and the office - most people probably have a much longer drive. If you do then you can mulitply my numbers to match your distance. Since I am lazy person I take the car. I used to have a Volkswagen Passat that probably released somewhere around 190g CO2 per km. Taking the car to and from the office one day would then contribute 3.4kg of CO2 to the atmosphere. If I do that 200 days per year it totals 684 kg of CO2 - way more than that access switch.

I also have a fiber connection and can pretty much do everything except mess around in the lab and meet people in person from my home office. If I had worked from home one day every two weeks (10% of the time) that would have saved 68 kg of CO2 emission driving that Passat which is more than enough for the combined power consumption for that access switch for a year. So I would have compensated for me and all my neighbours and then some just by working from home 20 days per year. What if a few of my neighbours also would work from home? Not using a fossil-fueled car makes a significant difference.

Table: CO2 per km from www.bilsvar.se

Car 20 km per day 20 km for 200 days
Volkswagen Passat 2010 3.8 kg 760 kg
Volvo V70 2015 diesel 2.2 kg 436 kg
Toyota Prius Hybrid 2014 1.0 kg 204 kg

Table: CO2 share of one port of 24-port access switch based on power mix

Country 1/24 port CO2 per day 1/24 port CO2 for 200 days
Sweden 2.6 g 0.5 kg
Germany 11 g 2.2 kg
Poland 33 g 6.5 kg
Estonia 55 g 11 kg

Today I drive a Hyundai Ioniq BEV - 100% electric. I cost me about 3 kWh roundtrip to the office and I'm charging at home. My electricity supposedly comes from renewable sources but the carbon mix for Sweden according to electricitymap.org in my last post was around 55g per kWh so using that it yields 165g CO2 back and forth or 33 kg CO2 per 200-work days.

So there you have it. 684kg CO2 for that car carrying one guy to to work changing to 33 kg for that same guy by going completely electric, or 0.5kg for my share of that access switch for 200 days if I were to park the car permanently and work from home instead.

In addition to enabling work from home more effectively than other communication technologies, fiber networks also drive the digital economy. We can do more things from home; shop for groceries (and have them delivered), have a doctor's appointment, have vast video libraries directly in our living room (saving a trip to the movies) etc. All of these are additional examples where we can park that car and make more from home instead. So fiber networks are also a significant investment into a better environment, but it all depends on clean energy.

What about meeting people then? That one thing a video call can't really replace?

Well, why not take a walk in your neighborhood. Perhaps you'll meet with your neighboring users instead.

Blog posts

European networks unvoluntary casulties of US-China trade-war

Submitted by fredrik.nyman on Mon, 09/02/2019 - 13:19

I usually don't comment on our competition but recent events such as new legislation proposal from the government in Sweden has sparked a well-needed debate. I commented on the situation for Swedish city networks last week in this IDG article https://computersweden.idg.se/2.2683/1.722350/konkurrent-varnar-huawei-stadsnat and also wrote a debat

Turn on automation of your FTTH network

Submitted by fredrik.nyman on Mon, 04/01/2019 - 09:08

The distributed nature of a fiber to the home network means that you will have equipment spread out and you might not always do the on-site installation yourself. If every switch has to pass your desk for pre-configuration port before getting deployed into the field you will need to deal with the logistics of getting the units from your warehouse via your desk, packing and unpacking, and clearly marking them so that the right unit goes into the right location.

SDN and NFV in FTTH

Submitted by fredrik.nyman on Thu, 03/21/2019 - 09:51

I love acronyms. You got three of them in the title of this post.

In recent years we got Software Defined Networking (SDN) and Network Function Virtualization (NFV). Many of the large telcos have invested millions into research of these subjects and are pushing the industry in this direction. Telefonica has expressed high ambitions to move to a completely SDN/NFV enabled network in record time. All the big ones are involved.

Keeping product lines around

Submitted by fredrik.nyman on Fri, 03/15/2019 - 09:50

Building fibre to the home networks are different from any traditional enterprise or telecommunications network. One of the main differences is the time it takes to complete the network. You make a plan, design a an architecture with VLANs and redundancy and imagine how this will scale as the number of connected customers increase. But then the years go by, because building a fibre network to connect every home in the community can take decades.

Save the planet - work from home

Submitted by fredrik.nyman on Thu, 03/07/2019 - 10:30

In my last post i revealed how dirty a fiber network can be depending on the source of electricity powering the network. I showed how a typcial 24-port access switch might contribute anything between 23kg to 485kg of carbon dioxide per year to the atmosphere depending on the electricity mix and how that can be reduced with lowpower optical modules.

How do you troubleshoot IoT devices?

Submitted by fredrik.nyman on Fri, 02/15/2019 - 13:00

Continuing on the subject of troubleshooting the network. Troubleshooting MPEG video has the benefit of a user that can tell you if it doesn't work and you can simply ask that user if the problem persists once you have fixed it. But what if there isn't any obvious way to determine if things are working, for example is that trashcan really signalling that its' full or does the temperature device really update the building climate control properly?